Aspirin Versus Clopidogrel for Long-Term Maintenance Monotherapy after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: The HOST-EXAM Extended Study

Jeehoon Kang, Kyung Woo Park, Huijin Lee, Doyeon Hwang, Han Mo Yang, Seung Woon Rha, Jang Whan Bae, Nam Ho Lee, Seung Ho Hur, Jung Kyu Han, Eun Seok Shin, Bon Kwon Koo, Hyo Soo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Long-term outcomes of antiplatelet monotherapy in patients who receive percutaneous coronary intervention are unknown. The HOST-EXAM (Harmonizing Optimal Strategy for Treatment of Coronary Artery Stenosis-Extended Antiplatelet Monotherapy) Extended study reports the posttrial follow-up results of the original HOST-EXAM trial. Methods: From March 2014 through May 2018, 5438 patients who maintained dual antiplatelet therapy without clinical events for 12±6 months after percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive clopidogrel (75 mg once daily) or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary end point (a composite of all-cause death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, readmission attributable to acute coronary syndrome, and Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 3 or greater bleeding), secondary thrombotic end point (cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, readmission attributable to acute coronary syndrome, and definite or probable stent thrombosis), and bleeding end point (Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 2 or greater bleeding) were analyzed during the extended follow-up period. Analysis was performed on the per-protocol population (2431 patients in the clopidogrel group and 2286 patients in the aspirin group). Results: During a median follow-up of 5.8 years (interquartile range, 4.8-6.2 years), the primary end point occurred in 12.8% and 16.9% in the clopidogrel and aspirin groups, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.63-0.86]; P<0.001). The clopidogrel group had a lower risk for the secondary thrombotic end point (7.9% versus 11.9%; hazard ratio, 0.66 [95% CI, 0.55-0.79]; P<0.001) and secondary bleeding end point (4.5% versus 6.1%; hazard ratio, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.57-0.94]; P=0.016). There was no significant difference in the incidence of all-cause death between the 2 groups (6.2% versus 6.0%; hazard ratio, 1.04 [95% CI, 0.82-1.31]; P=0.742). Landmark analysis at 2 years showed that the beneficial effect of clopidogrel was consistent throughout the follow-up period. Conclusions: During an extended follow-up of >5 years after randomization, clopidogrel monotherapy compared with aspirin monotherapy was associated with lower rates of the composite net clinical outcome in patients without clinical events for 12±6 months after percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents. Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT02044250.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-117
Number of pages10
JournalCirculation
Volume147
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Jan 10
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • percutaneous coronary intervention
  • platelet aggregation inhibitors
  • treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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