Designing metal halide perovskite nanoparticle-based resistive random-access memory devices through chemical treatments

Junhyuk Ahn, Junsung Bang, Young Min Kim, Seongkeun Oh, Soo Young Kim, Yun Mo Sung, Soong Ju Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Metal-halide perovskite (CsPbX3; X = Cl, Br, and I)-based resistive random-access memory (ReRAM) devices are emerging as promising candidates for neuromorphic systems owing to their low operation voltage and distinct ‘true’ and ‘false’ signals. However, conventional ReRAM devices exploit bulk or a few hundred micrometer-sized perovskites, which are unsuitable for achieving brain-inspired memory devices. This is because nanometer-sized perovskites exhibit a high density of defects on their surfaces, thus resulting in poor or negligible resistive switching characteristics. Herein, defects are engineered on (zero dimensional; 0D) CsPbX3 perovskite nanoparticle (PNP) surfaces, their chemical compositions are tuned by water treatment, and the role of the defects in achieving ReRAM devices is investigated. Theoretical estimations (density functional theory and molecular dynamics) and empirical analyses reveal that H2O molecules reduce the defect density and generate clean surfaces. Through the water- and water-halide treatments on CsPbBr3 PNPs, we successfully demonstrated 0D (18.7±2.4 nm) perovskite-based ReRAM devices and achieve a high ION/IOFF ratio (>105).

Original languageEnglish
Article number100388
JournalMaterials Today Nano
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Dec

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • 0D metal halide perovskite
  • Anion exchange
  • Perovskite nanoparticle
  • ReRAM
  • Surface engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Chemistry

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