Electrical mobility separation of airborne particles using integrated microfabricated corona ionizer and separator electrodes

Beelee Chua, Anthony S. Wexler, Norman C. Tien, Debbie A. Niemeier, Britt A. Holmen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Airborne particles are separated according to their electrical mobilities using a microfabricated corona ionizer and separator electrodes. Oleic acid particles with sizes ranging from 30 to 300 nm are used to characterize the device. They are generated using a TSI 3075 constant output atomizer. These particles are electrically charged by a microfabricated corona ionizer, and the resultant particle electrical mobility is a function of the size of the particle. A varying dc potential difference of 0-2 kV across the separator electrodes selects charged particles of various electrical mobilities. These separated particles are subsequently counted using a TSI 3025A Condensation Particle Counter. The device demonstrated its ability to separate particles between 50 and 130 nm into five distinct size bins. The operational flow rate is 0.5 L/min, and the micropin-between-planes corona ionizer operates at 1.3 kV with 7 μA. The theoretical and experimental electrical mobilities of the particles are compared.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-13
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Microelectromechanical Systems
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank the support rendered by Dr. Y. Zhao, Dr. M. Zhang, J. Wen, Dr. S. S. Park, Dr. W.-P. Shih, M. Chan, V. J. Logeeswaran, Northern California Nanofabrication Center at UC Davis, and Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center. This work was sponsored by the California Energy Commission (Commission, Energy Commission) through the California Air Resources Board. It does not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its employees, or the State of California. The Commission, the State of California, its employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warranty, expressed or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the use of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the Commission nor has the Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this information in this report.

Funding Information:
Manuscript received April 3, 2008; revised November 12, 2008. First published January 20, 2009; current version published February 4, 2009. This work was supported by the California Energy Commission (Commission, Energy Commission) through the California Air Resources Board. Subject Editor R. R. A. Syms.

Keywords

  • Aerosol instrumentation
  • Corona ionizer
  • Particle electrical mobility
  • Particle separation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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