Enhanced astaxanthin production of Haematococcus pluvialis strains induced salt and high light resistance with gamma irradiation

Ha Eun Yang, Byung Sun Yu, Sang Jun Sim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was conducted to increase the productivity of biomass that contains high astaxanthin content by developing a mutant Haematococcus pluvialis strain with strong environmental tolerance. H. pluvialis has a low cell-growth rate and is vulnerable to stressors such as salinity or light intensity, which may hinder large-scale commercial cultivation. A mutant M5 strain selected through 5000-Gy gamma irradiation showed improved biomass and astaxanthin production under high-salinity and high-light intensity conditions. With enhanced SOD activity and overexpressed astaxanthin biosynthesis genes (lyc, crtR-b, bkt2), M5 demonstrated an increase in biomass and astaxanthin productivity by 86.70 % and 66.15 %, respectively compared to those of untreated cells. Also, the omega-3 content of M5 increased by 149.44 % under 40 mM CaCl2 compared to the untreated cells. Finally, even when subjected to high-intensity light irradiation for the whole life cycle, the biomass and astaxanthin concentration increased by 84.99 % and 241 %, respectively, compared to the wild-type cells.

Original languageEnglish
Article number128651
JournalBioresource technology
Volume372
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Mar

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Commercializations Promotion Agency for R&D Outcomes (COMPA) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) (No. 2021B100).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Astaxanthin
  • Gamma ray
  • Haematococcus pluvialis
  • High light intensity
  • Salinity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Waste Management and Disposal

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