Gamma-glutamyl transferase variability and risk of dementia: A nationwide study

You Bin Lee, Kyungdo Han, Sanghyun Park, Seon Mee Kim, Nan Hee Kim, Kyung Mook Choi, Sei Hyun Baik, Yong Gyu Park, Hye Jin Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Variability in various biomarkers has emerged as a new clinical indicator for diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) has a potential to be involved in the pathogenesis of dementia due to its function as a marker of oxidative stress and atherosclerosis. We investigated the association between baseline GGT, GGT variability, and dementia risk for the first time in a large population. Methods: The Korean National Health Insurance Service datasets of claims and preventive health check-ups from 2004 to 2016 were used for this retrospective longitudinal study. The risk of incident dementia (all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia) was analyzed according to sex-specific quartiles of baseline GGT and GGT variability, and groups categorized by baseline GGT and GGT variability in ≥40-year-old individuals without baseline dementia (N = 6 046 442; mean follow-up 6.32 years). Results: During follow-up, 166 851 cases of new dementia developed. The fully adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident dementia increased in the higher quartiles of baseline GGT and GGT variability (HR [95% CI]: Q2, 1.034 [1.019-1.049]; Q3, 1.090 [1.075-1.105]; Q4, 1.212 [1.196-1.229]). The association between GGT variability quartiles and dementia risk remained significant even after adjusting for log-transformed baseline GGT level. The fully adjusted HRs for dementia was highest in the group with high baseline GGT concentration and the highest GGT variability quartile [HR (95% CI): 1.273 (1.250-1.296)]. Conclusions: Not only baseline GGT level, but also GGT variability may be an independent predictor of dementia, and might be used for risk stratification for future dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1105-1114
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume35
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Oct 1

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), Grant/Award Number: 2018R1D1A1B07047587 Funding information

Funding Information:
This work was performed using the database from the National Health Insurance Service, and the results do not necessarily represent the opinion of the National Health Insurance Corporation. Dr. H. J. Yoo was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2018R1D1A1B07047587). The sponsor had no role in the design, methods, data collections, analysis, or preparation of paper.

Funding Information:
This work was performed using the database from the National Health Insurance Service, and the results do not necessarily represent the opinion of the National Health Insurance Corporation. Dr. H. J. Yoo was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2018R1D1A1B07047587). The sponsor had no role in the design, methods, data collections, analysis, or preparation of paper.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • dementia
  • gamma-glutamyl transferase
  • variability
  • vascular dementia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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