IGZO-based electrolyte-gated field-effect transistor for in situ biological sensing platform

Myung Sic Chae, Ju Hyun Park, Hyun Woo Son, Kyo Seon Hwang, Tae Geun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)-based electrolyte-gated field-effect transistor (IGZO-EGFET) was fabricated and its feasibility as a biological sensing platform was evaluated. Herein, a 50-nm-thick IGZO thin film deposited via radio-frequency sputtering was utilized as both the active channel and biological interface of the device. The fabricated IGZO-EGFET operated by inducing a gate voltage directly through the liquid electrolyte at a low bias range (∼±1.5 V) with a subthreshold swing of 185 mV dec−1. The high uniformity of electrical characteristics for the devices were confirmed with 11.4% chip-to-chip deviation by measuring the threshold voltages (Vth), and the shift of Vth was employed as a major parameter to determine the biological interactions. In order to assess IGZO-EGFETs as a biosensing platform, first, pH sensing was conducted with and without amino-silanization on the IGZO surface. The amine-modified device showed steeper slope between Vth shifts and pH variations (68.5 mV pH−1) than that (32.7 mV pH−1) of the bare IGZO-EGFET. Subsequently, IGZO-EGFETs immobilized with a monoclonal antibody were employed for the in situ detection of alpha-synuclein (αS) proteins in concentration ranges from 10 fg mL−1 to 1 ng mL−1. The results showed that IGZO-EGFETs are suitable for the specific recognition of analytes with a linear relationship of 9.35 mV dec−1 between Vth shifts and αS concentrations in a logarithmic scale, verifying its applicability as a sensing device for biological interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)876-883
Number of pages8
JournalSensors and Actuators, B: Chemical
Volume262
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jun 1

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) [grant number 2016R1A3B1908249 ]. M.-S. Chae was born in Seoul, Republic of Korea, on March 22, 1988. He received the B.S. degree in Chemical engineering from the Dankook University, Yongin, Republic of Korea in 2011 and the M.S. degree in Chemical and Biological Engineering from the Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea in 2013. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree in the Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. His research interests include graphene-based devices, oxide-semiconductor devices and biosensors. J.H. Park was born in Pocheon, Republic of Korea, on June 12, 1987. He received the B.S. degree in Electronic and IT Media Engineering from the Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Republic of Korea, in 2013. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. His research is focused on oxide-based thin film transistors and nonvolatile memory devices. H.W. Son was born in Seoul, Republic of Korea, on February 8, 1991. He received the B.S. degree in Electronic Material Engineering from the Kwangwoon University, Seoul, Republic of Korea in 2017. He is currently working toward the M.S. degree in the electrical engineering, Seoul, Korea University. His research is focused on oxide semiconductors and its applications. K.S. Hwang received the Ph.D. degree in Electronics and Computer Engineering from Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea in 2007. From 2008–2017, he was a Senior/Principal Research Scientist at Center for BioMicrosystems of Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul, Republic of Korea. From 2011–2012, he focused on nanomaterial analysis to apply sensor development and performance improvement as visiting scientist in Center for Functional Nanomaterials of Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York, US. He joined the Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea in 2017, where he is now an associate professor. His current research area includes biosensors, bioelectronics, and the clinical diagnosis associated to the neurodegenerative diseases and a variety number of cancers. T.G. Kim received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea in 1990, 1993, and 1997, respectively, all in Electronics Engineering. From 1997–2002, he was with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, as a Postdoctoral Fellow, the Electron Device Division of Electrotechnical Laboratory, Japan, as a New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization Fellow, and the MD Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon, Korea, as a Principal Research Scientist. He is currently with the School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University. His current research interests include electrical/optical semiconductor materials and devices and their applications for nonvolatile memory devices, optical devices and micro/nano electrical devices.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Biosensor
  • EGFET
  • Igzo
  • Oxide semiconductor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Instrumentation
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Materials Chemistry

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