Neddylation of insulin receptor substrate acts as a bona fide regulator of insulin signaling and its implications for cancer cell migration

Jun Bum Park, Geon Ho Moon, Ara Cho, Minji Kwon, Jong Wan Park, Eugene C. Yi, Haeryoung Kim, Junji Fukuda, Cheol Kwak, Young Gyu Ko, Yang Sook Chun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Irregularities in insulin signaling have significantly increased the risk of various cancers, yet the precise underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Within our study, we observed that inhibiting neddylation enhances cancer cell migration across different cancer types by activating both insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1 and IRS2), along with the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Notably, in the context of high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) patients, whether they had type 2 diabetes mellitus or not, IRS1 and IRS2 displayed a parallel relationship with each other while exhibiting an inverse relationship with NEDD8. We also identified C-CBL as an E3 ligase responsible for neddylating IRS1 and IRS2, with clinical evidence further confirming a reciprocal relationship between C-CBL and pAKT, thereby reinforcing the tumor suppressive role of C-CBL. Altogether, these findings suggest that neddylation genuinely participates in IRS1 and IRS2-dependent insulin signaling, effectively suppressing cancer cell migration. Thus, caution is advised when considering neddylation inhibitors as a treatment option for cancer patients, particularly those presenting with insulin signaling dysregulations linked to conditions like obesity-related type 2 diabetes or hyperinsulinemia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCancer Gene Therapy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024, The Author(s).

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research

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