Nurses' but not supervisors' safety practices are linked with job satisfaction

David A. Hurtado, Seung Sup Kim, S. V. Subramanian, Jack T. Dennerlein, David C. Christiani, Dean M. Hashimoto, Glorian Sorensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To test the associations of safety practices as reported by nurses and their respective unit supervisors with job satisfaction. Background: Psychosocial workplace factors are associated with job satisfaction; however, it is unknown whether nurses and supervisors accounts of safety practices are differentially linked to this outcome. Methods: Cross-sectional study design including nurses (n = 1052) nested in 94 units in two hospitals in Boston (MA, USA). Safety practices refer to the identification and control of occupational hazards at the unit. Safety practices were measured aggregating nurses' responses per unit, and supervisory levels. Individual's job satisfaction for each nurse was the response variable. Results: Supervisors assessed safety practices more favourably than their unit nursing staff. Adjusted random intercept logistic regressions showed that the odds of higher job satisfaction were higher for nurses at units with better safety practices (OR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.68) compared with nurses at units that averaged lower safety practices. Supervisors' reports of safety practices were not correlated with the job satisfaction of their staff. Conclusions: Adequate safety practices might be a relevant managerial role that enhances job satisfaction among nurses. Implications for nursing management: Nursing supervisors should calibrate their safety assessments with their nursing staff to improve nurses' job satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)491-497
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Oct

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by a grant from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to the Harvard School of Public Health Center for Work, Health and Well-being. This study would not have been accomplished without the participation of Partners HealthCare System and leadership from Dennis Colling, Sree Chaguturu and Kurt Westerman. The authors would like to thank Partners Occupational Health Services including Marlene Free-ley for her guidance, as well as Karen Hopcia, Elizabeth Taylor, Elizabeth Tucker O’Day and Terry Orechia. We also thank individuals at each of the hospitals, including Jeanette Ives Erickson and Jacqueline Somerville in Patient Care Services leadership, and Jeff Davis and Julie Celano in Human Resources. Additionally, we wish to thank Charlene Feilteau, Mimi O’Connor, Margaret Shaw, Eddie Tan and Shari Weingarten for assistance with supporting databases. We also thank Chris Kenwood of NERI for his statistical and programming support, Julie Theron, Project Director, and Linnea Benson-Whelan for her assistance with the production of this manuscript. D.A.H. led the writing of the manuscript. S.-S.K. and G.S. conceptualised the study. S.-S.K. analysed the data and made the first draft. G.S., S.V.S., J.T.D., D.C.C. and D.M.H. provided the critical reviews for the draft. All authors participated in revising the paper.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by a grant from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to the Harvard School of Public Health Center for Work, Health and Well-being. This study would not have been accomplished without the participation of Partners HealthCare System and leadership from Dennis Colling, Sree Chaguturu and Kurt Westerman. The authors would like to thank Partners Occupational Health Services including Marlene Freeley for her guidance, as well as Karen Hopcia, Elizabeth Taylor, Elizabeth Tucker O'Day and Terry Orechia. We also thank individuals at each of the hospitals, including Jeanette Ives Erickson and Jacqueline Somerville in Patient Care Services leadership, and Jeff Davis and Julie Celano in Human Resources. Additionally, we wish to thank Charlene Feilteau, Mimi O'Connor, Margaret Shaw, Eddie Tan and Shari Weingarten for assistance with supporting databases. We also thank Chris Kenwood of NERI for his statistical and programming support, Julie Theron, Project Director, and Linnea Benson-Whelan for her assistance with the production of this manuscript. D.A.H. led the writing of the manuscript. S.-S.K. and G.S. conceptualised the study. S.-S.K. analysed the data and made the first draft. G.S., S.V.S., J.T.D., D.C.C. and D.M.H. provided the critical reviews for the draft. All authors participated in revising the paper.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by a grant from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U19 OH008861) for the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Center for Work, Health and Well-being.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • job satisfaction
  • multilevel studies
  • nurse management
  • safety practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Nurses' but not supervisors' safety practices are linked with job satisfaction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this