Possible enhancement in ocean productivity associated with wildfire-derived nutrient and black carbon deposition in the Arctic Ocean in 2019–2021

Min Woo Seok, Young Ho Ko, Ki Tae Park, Tae Wook Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Arctic is severely affected by climate change and various forms of environmental pollution. Enriched with nutrients and light-absorbing compounds, the wildfire plume has the potential to affect biological carbon fixation and sequestration within the Arctic Ocean. In this study, we utilized satellite-derived oceanic data (phytoplankton and sea ice) and atmospheric reanalysis products (black carbon, BC, indicative of wildfire impact) to evaluate the effect of the pronounced increase in wildfires from 2019 to 2021 on the East Siberian Sea. During these years, chlorophyll-a levels rose by ∼213 % compared to the previous decadal average, which had notably lower wildfire activities. This increase in chlorophyll-a is attributable to the deposition of nitrogen from the wildfire plume. Concurrently, the period required for sea ice concentration to decrease by 25 % was on average ∼ 10 days shorter than usual. This suggests that BC-induced acceleration of sea ice melting might extend the growing season for phytoplankton.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116149
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume201
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024 Apr

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Arctic Ocean
  • Black carbon
  • Marine productivity
  • Sea ice melting
  • Wildfires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Pollution

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