Predictors of Quality of Life in Patients With Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy Receiving Nonsurgical Management Due to Chronic Pain: QoL in DCM Patients

Yeong Gi Lee, Sung Reul Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Most patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) experience pain, and their quality of life (QoL) is poor. Aims: This study aimed to identify predictors of QoL, including demographic, clinical, physical, and psychosocial characteristics, in chronic pain patients with DCM receiving non-surgical management. Design: A descriptive study design was used. Setting: Participants were recruited at the pain clinic at a university hospital in Seoul, South Korea. Participants/Subjects: The subjects included 157 inpatients and outpatients with DCM receiving non-surgical management. Methods: We administered a written, structured, self-reported questionnaire, which included standard validated measures for the main variables of interest. Results: The median number of pain sites was two, and the average and most pain severities were 4.63 ± 2.35 and 5.71 ± 2.32 out of 10 within one month, respectively. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that depression, education level, and headache were factors influencing physical QoL. Depression, education level, and marital status were factors influencing psychological QoL, whereas depression and education level were factors influencing social relationships QoL. Finally, the factors influencing environmental QoL were depression, educational level, and marital status. Conclusions: Demographic characteristics, including educational level and marital status, clinical characteristics, including pain site, and psychological characteristics, including depression, were identified as factors influencing QoL in chronic pain patients with DCM receiving non-surgical management. Clinical Implications: Healthcare professionals should consider demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics when evaluating patients. QoL. In addition, it is necessary to pay attention to the QoL of participants who are single and have lower levels of education, headache pain, and high levels of depression. These patients are likely to have low QoL and strategies to improve their QoL should be developed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e26-e34
JournalPain Management Nursing
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Aug

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 American Society for Pain Management Nursing

Keywords

  • Cervical Vertebrae
  • Depression
  • Pain
  • Quality of life
  • Spinal Cord Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

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